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The DWP appear to be planning to only pay the enhanced rate of the mobility component of personal independence payment (PIP)on physical grounds to claimants whose mobility is so restricted that they have difficulties moving between rooms indoors.  Those who can manage indoors but have difficulty outdoors may only be awarded the lower rate of the mobility component.

The evidence is contained at page 74 of the DWP document  ‘Government response to the consultation on the personal independence payment assessment criteria and regulations’ which you can download from a link on this page.

Although the document begins by saying, in relation to ‘Moving around’:

“This activity should be judged in relation to a type of surface normally expected out of doors such as pavements on the flat and includes the consideration of kerbs.”

It goes on to add that:

“20 metres is considered to be the distance that a claimant is required to be able to walk in order to achieve a basic level of independence in the home such as the ability to move between rooms.

“50 metres is considered to be the distance that a claimant is required to be able to walk in order to achieve a basic level of independence such as the ability to get from a car park to the supermarket.”

Almost identical guidance is give in the ‘PIP Assessment Guide.  A DWP guidance document for providers carrying out assessments for Personal Independence Payment’   which states at page 97:

“20 metres is considered to be the distance that a claimant is required to be able to repeatedly walk in order to achieve a basic level of independence in the home.

“50 metres is considered to be the distance that a claimant is required to be able to repeatedly walk in order to achieve a basic level of independence outdoors.”

To score the required 12 points to get enhanced rate mobility for physical health problems alone, a claimant must prove that they can’t stand and move more than 20 metres even using aids and/or with assistance.  This means that in the majority of cases the private sector health professionals are likely to be looking for evidence  that the claimant has problems with indoor mobility, rather than outdoor, if they are to be awarded the enhanced rate.

Under DLA, if you are unable to walk more than  50 metres you are likely to qualify for the higher rate of the mobility component and whilst aids and appliances are taken into account, you are not required to show you could not manage this distance even with assistance from another person.

It seems then, that without ever disclosing it during consultations, the DWP have decided that PIP higher rate mobility is primarily for people with such restricted mobility that they are unlikely to be fully independent when moving around indoors.  Claimants who can manage to move around indoors independently but are very limited in their mobility outdoors may only be eligible for lower rate mobility.

Comments  

#26 Mandy 2017-02-16 09:08
I hate how this assumes a person can drive....walkin g 50metres from car park doesn't necessarily mean you can be independent outdoors. I CANT DRIVE due to psychosis and medications. The mobility component would let me call a taxi now and then...a chance to go out a couple times a month....but nooooo I have to walk miles and miles for outdoor independence which is impossible! So trapped.
#25 Gilly Nicnac 2017-02-08 17:25
Looking on the Internet I have seen that in Ireland Fibromyalgia is recognised as lifelong disability. I wonder if this will ever be so in England? Has anyone got any thoughts on this
#24 Gilly Nicnac 2017-02-08 17:23
Due to change in my condition (diagnosed with fibromyalgia as well as existing conditions) I advised DWP. I was already in receipt of Pip standard rate for care and mobility. I filled in new forms and input that my walking was restricted to 12 to 15 metres. They still gave me as before even after reconsideration . It went to appeal and I chose not to attend. It was adjourned and I was asked to attend which I did last week together with my husband (my carer). The lady judge was lovely, also a male doctor. There was another lady there who was from disability (not DWP). From the beginning she did not look interested like she didn't want to be there. At one point I was answering her question and she was busy under the desk to find a folder (I thought this was very rude of her). At the end I was awarded enhanced care but still standard mobility. They stated I could walk up to 50 metres (even though my application and my comments said 12 to 15 metres)
#23 PETER MCCLEMENTS 2014-09-14 19:38
having just applied for ESA and PIP i,m worried before it even starts ,,i,m struggling to walk with shortness of breath ,,diabeties,hig h blood pressure,knee and shoulder arthritis..17 stone and 5 foot 7 inches so also obese ,high uncontrlable blood pressure....not able to work as a;ways tired and breath;ess high cholestrol
+2 #22 wijen77 2013-02-21 16:24
Is there any kind of PIP form yet?
Or any indication of when we might see one?
My friends DLA runs out in about four weeks, it used to be that she was notified before hand but as yet has heard nothing.
I'm very concerned, her fitness note is due for renewal next week the Dr will write one for a year, she is on SDA at the moment with enhanced payments because she has been receiving it since its inception. I'm expecting that she will have to go through an ESA assessment. She will be worse off on ESA and at the same time will have to go through the untried PIP procedure... My friend has a problem with mobility she can walk 20 metres but then she is exhausted and would not be able to move again for ages. I am seriously concerned that the stress will kill her!
+2 #21 deegill 2013-02-18 20:33
Claimants who can manage to move around indoors independently but are very limited in their mobility outdoors may only be eligible for lower rate mobility.

Most days i can walk around indoors on my own with hanging on to door frames, furniture and whatever i can hold on to while going from room to room, but my mobility outside is very limited, i need a power chair if going around shops or using my sticks if popping in to a shop. By the sounds of the new critia I will loose my high rate, which means i will loose my car and blue badge, in turn this will leave me house bound as i am semi rural, i won't be able to take my powerchair on a bus as the buses around here don't have low floors or are big enough. Loosing my badge will mean having to park further away from the shops, as it is i rarely go out anyway cause of pain/fatigue i suffer with Fibromyalgia and ME (to name a few problems!) so when i do eventually go out i need to be able to park as close to the shop / shops needed even with my powerchair, i can't cope with being out for more than 45mins, from time of leaving home to being back indoors.
Indoors, im either in my chair or bed, only get up to go to bathroom, house isn't big enough for a wheelchair, barely able to use both crutches indoors due to room, so when in extreme pain i reluctantly use one of my crutches. 20m around the house isn't alot unless going from room to room guess this is their 'repeatedly'. So many people rely on their mobility cars for that reason - mobility and so many are going to loose that and their blue badge due to not being on the enhanced rate, leaving them housebound. This really hasn't been thought out - apology's if this doesn't make sense i have cognitive problems and thinking, getting what i want to say to make sense leads me to babbling!
+5 #20 Peter 2013-02-18 14:24
there is one problem for claiming when you are dead, you will need an atos assesment and a note from you doctor, and don't forget you will have to attend and sign in!
+4 #19 TCP 2013-02-17 20:18
The rules regarding welfare benefits are getting tighter and tighter. It won't be long before you have to be dead to qualify for anything. It disgusts me. What did the govt say about protecting and supporting the genuinely sick and disabled??
+4 #18 jennifer 2013-02-17 18:19
we all need to start using our vote thats the only way maybe then we might get somebody with a bit of common sense!!
+1 #17 carruthers 2013-02-17 15:15
Quoting Roy:
Am I missing something? I've read the article several times, and each time, it appears to still be saying that not being able to walk more than 50 metres repeatedly DOES qualify.

This article is about how "able to walk 20m" or "able to walk 50m" is going to be worked out by Atos or Capita and the Decision Makers at the DWP. Going by the guidance that the DWP is issuing (as opposed to the law!) then their interpretation is going to be very draconian.

What the article does NOT say, because the information is elsewhere, is that those who can walk 50m are going to get enough points to qualify for PIP, but only at the lower level. This lower level will not qualify you for a Motability car.

However, in your case it is possible that the "repeatability" and "safety" factors may come into play. You will have to read the guides very carefully. Also, I think that something you can only do 2 or 3 days a week counts as something you can't do. Again, check the guides.
+2 #16 Roy 2013-02-15 11:42
Am I missing something? I've read the article several times, and each time, it appears to still be saying that not being able to walk more than 50 metres repeatedly DOES qualify. I quote: “50 metres is considered to be the distance that a claimant is required to be able to repeatedly walk in order to achieve a basic level of independence outdoors.”. But then your commentary on it only talks about the 20m limit, and implies that the 50m outdoor criterion won't apply. Are you saying that this will only get the basis rate? If so, where is the evidence for that? As an ME sufferer this is going to be critical to me. Without a motability vehicle, I will have severe difficulty. And what do we mean by repeatedly? Any idea? Once every 10 minutes, every half hour, every hour, twice a day?

Variability is an issue - I was awarded higher rate mobility allowance in 2008 without further questions, and without a medical much to my surprise, given that I answered 200m for this. I had thought I would only get lower rate. I can only assume it was because I elaborated with extensive notes describing how I actually cope, my tendency to fall and stumble, to negotiate kerbs, and so need somebody with me, but also because I explained that on some occasions - usually at least once in every day - when I couldn't walk any more than a few steps, and that on othes I could exceed the 200m, but doing so, or even walking the 200m, would have the high risk of bringing on post-exertional fatigue, sometimes half to one day later, that would leave me both bodily and cognitive unable to undertake any activity. I also detailed that doing so on repeated occasions during the day would increase the chance that this would occur.

I therefore thought that, given the 50m criterion for walking outdoors appeared little different to DLA, I would get the enhanced rate of PIP in the same way. Your article now leaves me unsure and worried about this.
+1 #15 carruthers 2013-02-15 03:10
@NDDN (#9)
Lord Freud said

Quote:
I assure him that, as regards the mobility criteria, we are looking specifically at outdoor movement-he was concerned that we were looking only at indoor movement-including how someone deals with uneven surfaces and steps, as that movement is clearly more difficult than indoor movement.
However, what a minister says in the House of Lords is not law. It sits further down in the scale of what actually matters than the guidelines laid down in the Decision Maker's Handbook or the guidance given to the assessors - Atos or Capita as to whether they should consider someone as able or unable to walk 20m or 50m. If they simply talk about indoor mobility, then that is what will be used - especially since it cuts down the number of people who will qualify for the higher level of benefit.

When that is challenged at a tribunal - as it surely will be - they will look at the law. If the law is ambiguous, as I suspect it is, then they will have to draw their own conclusions. We will not know how this is going to play out in 2013 and quite possibly not in 2014.
+3 #14 annken 2013-02-14 22:20
I think they lay in bed at night and think who can we upset next!! If there is any fairness in the world they will have to struggle like we do at some point in their lives.
#13 carruthers 2013-02-14 22:04
Try some logic on this one:

A] "20 metres is considered to be the distance that a claimant is required to be able to repeatedly walk in order to achieve a basic level of independence in the home."

Logically this means, "20m done repeatedly" is defined as "having a basic level of independence in the home."

B] "a basic level of independence in the home such as the ability to move between rooms."

The most likely interpretation of this is, "a basic level of independence in the home is defined as the ability to move between rooms."

Put the two together and it says,

C] "20m done repeatedly" is defined as "the ability to move between rooms".

Take that one stage further and it means that anyone who can get between rooms several times a day or walk outside can manage "20m done repeatedly" and doesn't need HR Mobility.

Here's a question. If they are going to work out how far you can walk at home, are they going to use a "virtual" home for you to get around, to match the "virtual wheelchair" that the ESA regs will assume you store there? "Well, you would be able to get around your home if you had a smaller home. You shouldn't be living in a house like that anyway."

Once I would have said that was pure paranoid fantasy - but if I'd said in 2009 that DLA MHR would soon be restricted to those who could manage
+8 #12 deegill 2013-02-14 21:49
walk from carpark to supermarket - what about walking around the supermarket and back to the car? which would be impossible for me. You'd loose your blue badge, so your unlikely to be able to park near the supermarket doors, so if it's a big carpark....well you get my drift!

I've had a letter saying I will be invited to claim PIP in 2015 (as on indefinate now) so do i have to hope my mobility around my home gets worse between now and then?

Suicide rates in ME/CFS people have already gone up due to ESA, now that'll climb further.

PIP - disgraceful!!
#11 milojenny 2013-02-14 15:22
Milojenny

It seems to me that if this is true regarding the revised PIP for mobility-if you can walk 3 steps out of your house and that is all you can do then you only qualify for the lower part of the mobility rate thus meaning you will be unable to apply or extend your lease/agreement with the mobility scheme.

How low is that-does Sir Ian Duncan Smith know about these draconian arrangements. Uncaring government I should say so. :sad:
+2 #10 Peter 2013-02-14 10:17
the next rule be if the cleient is breathing is an automatic disallow for any benefits
+1 #9 NDDN 2013-02-14 08:37
paragraph 741 states it is outdoors not indoors

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld201213/ldhansrd/text/130213-0002.htm#13021378000090
+4 #8 highlydistressed 2013-02-13 23:56
It`s OK folks, we are not allowed any quality of life at all. If you cannot get out of your home you are imprisoned. If you can get out of your home, no benefits.
I wonder where the phrase `Politically correct English` originated from? Every sentence the DWP attempts to convey, is so twisted and warped, I do not think they clearly understand the meaning of it themselves. And to confuse things further, when they do not fully understand it they re-write it adding even more confusion. It`s not just us that baffled, it is them that`s baffled - completely.
+3 #7 kathy 2013-02-13 14:44
Apart from pain and fatigue, I have balance an coordination problems because of a neurological condition. I have to think about every step I take and how I do it. I rely on my vision to walk and dare not turn my head or side step to avoid a hazard. Changes in light and reflections cause great problems. The sensory messages to my brain are not conveyed properly, hence my feet do not know where the ground is, so even on level ground I miss my footing and stumble and fall
without warning. In my home, motor memory takes over to some extent and my movements from room to room are so common place, and with the aid of walls and furniture to touch I am reasonable OK, but still have to think about every move and the speed at which I do it. I wondered why in all the DWP publications the fact that you can be assessed at home seems to have come to the forefront.

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