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The success rate for both PIP and ESA appeals has risen again to an all-time high of 75%, according to figures released by the Tribunals Service last week.

The latest data shows that PIP appeal success rates have gone up every quarter since the first quarter of 2017/18. They have now risen by 10% between that time and the first quarter of 2019/20, the latest period for which figures are available.

The story is very similar for ESA, with an almost remorseless rise over the last two years to the current high of 75%.

The success rate for DLA is also showing a steady increase, it is now at 67%.

Universal credit is at 65%, up 10% on a year ago, although the number of appeals is still relatively low.

However, whilst success rates are rising, the number of appeals is falling.

ESA appeals have fallen by 35% compared with a year ago and PIP appeals by 15%.

The figures also show that the waiting time to get to an appeal from the date it is lodged is now 30 weeks, up three weeks on a year ago.

Combined with a waiting time of 10 weeks for a mandatory reconsideration this means that PIP claimants are now waiting an average of 40 weeks for justice.

The fact that three out of every four PIP and ESA appellants are winning their appeals, in spite of the introduction of mandatory reconsiderations, must be a source of enormous dismay for the DWP and should be encouraging more claimants to challenge decisions.

But the fall in the number of appeals will be a source of comfort for the department and suggest that they are working very hard to discourage claimants from getting as far as a tribunal.

You can download the latest appeal tribunal statistics from this link

Comments  

#3 Mr Nibbles 2019-09-18 15:10
Quoting Chris:
One possible cause for the reduction of the number of tribunal appeals is that the DWP contact the claimants before the appeal and change their decision. This happened to me. Two months after I filed an appeal, I received a letter stating that my decision had been reviewed and changed, therefore the appeal was cancelled.

This also potentially means that 'strong cases' that would normally win at the tribunal are changed without going to tribunal (which I was incredibly grateful for as I avoided the long period of uncertainty etc.). But what it means is that if these 'strong cases' made it to tribunal, the success rate would be, likely, higher than 75%, reflecting even more badly on the DWP.

Based on my experience, and to repeat the excellent advice someone on this forum gave me, P E R S E V E R E... :-)


This happened to me too - a few weeks after I appealed (PIP re-assessment), they called me and said they'd looked again and were willing to re-instate my PIP at the previous level - and they asked me if that was okay!! :-o - I said yes and when I got the letter confirming it, the summary was SO different to their original summary you'd think it was for a different person! - Just goes to show they 'cherry-pick' items, sentences, or even PARTS of sentences, to make the 'decision' they've already decided upon.
+2 #2 Chris 2019-09-18 12:07
One possible cause for the reduction of the number of tribunal appeals is that the DWP contact the claimants before the appeal and change their decision. This happened to me. Two months after I filed an appeal, I received a letter stating that my decision had been reviewed and changed, therefore the appeal was cancelled.

This also potentially means that 'strong cases' that would normally win at the tribunal are changed without going to tribunal (which I was incredibly grateful for as I avoided the long period of uncertainty etc.). But what it means is that if these 'strong cases' made it to tribunal, the success rate would be, likely, higher than 75%, reflecting even more badly on the DWP.

Based on my experience, and to repeat the excellent advice someone on this forum gave me, P E R S E V E R E... :-)
#1 mrfibrospondodysthmatic 2019-09-17 14:51
It should be 95%

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