Benefits and Work has compiled a list of over 500 conditions arranged in order of how hard it is to get an award of PIP, using the DWP’s own Stat-Xplore database.

The overall average success rate for PIP claims is 52%.

But this can vary greatly depending on the condition.

So, for example, awards for continence related conditions tend to fall below the average:

  • Urge incontinence  13.7%
  • Stress incontinence  15.7%
  • Faecal soiling (encopresis) 23.8%
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) 26.1%

Awards for arthritis, on the other hand, are above the average:

  • Osteoarthritis of other single joint  56.5%
  • Osteoarthritis of Knee  64.2%
  • Osteoarthritis of Hip 73.8%
  • Primary generalised Osteoarthritis 74.0%
  • Rheumatoid arthritis 74.7%

Awards relating to mental health vary widely:

  • Anxiety disorders - Other / type not known  38.8%
  • Generalised anxiety disorder  42.7%
  • Anxiety and depressive disorders – mixed  49.6%
  • Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)  58.2%
  • Bipolar affective disorder  61.3%
  • Schizophrenia  69.7%

Some conditions are extremely likely to attract an award:

  • Dementia 94.1%        
  • Motor neurone disease 97.5%
  • Down’s syndrome 99.6%
  • Creutzfeldt - Jacob disease (CJD) 100%

But on its own this doesn’t tell the whole tale.  For example, it doesn’t tell us what percentage of claimants got the enhanced rate of one or both components.

We can drill down further into DWP statistics to get these details. But it would be an enormous task to produce this information for every condition.

And it still wouldn’t tell us whether claimants are more or less likely to get the award that they think is correct.

So, we’d like to hear from readers about which conditions you think are the hardest to make a PIP claim for. 

You may have experience of claiming for more than one condition.  You may have helped people with different conditions who have put in a claim. Or you may consider your condition to be hard to claim for because it is treated with scepticism by some in the health professions.

Based on your feedback, we will produce more information about award rates for specific conditions.

Members can download the full list of over 500 conditions and percentage success rates in a pdf file entitled ‘Success rates for PIP claims by condition’ from the ‘Claims’ section of the PIP guides page.

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  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Kb · 1 years ago
    Fibromyalgia is definitely the most hardest to get pip for .The question's they ask don't help as a fibromyalgia person it's so difficult to answer ,every day ,every hour is different,pain is always there but effects you in various areas,some days you manage others you can be stuck in bed .How can you tell them what a normal day is like ..
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    Clare · 1 years ago
    ME/CFS - fluctuating, invisible and still stigmatised
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Pauline · 1 years ago
    Fibromyalgia is a hard one. There are so many related conditions attached under the umbrella but at my recent face to face I was continually asked if I had a specific diagnosis for the related conditions. The answer was no because its covered by Fibromyalgia diagnosis. For example I have numbness and pain in my hands that means I am not always able to grip cutlery, pens etc but this was completely discounted because I don't have a specific diagnosis for it.  Same with questions about mobility. This varies greatly but constant questioning about time and distance. These are almost impossible to answer. The entire format is designed to be obscure enough so as to deny claims
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Claire · 1 years ago
      @Pauline Same as you I have special cutlery  my husband has to cut meat up etc peel potatoes etc because the pain is so bad ..although I've been tested and told I have fibromalgia  .the dwp don't care good luck
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Hypermobilecat · 1 years ago
    When a dwp doctor came to my home,to be fair he gave a good report. He wrote I should have someone with me when outside as I have ehler danlos syndrome. He also wrote that for a woman my age (42) I could only do things very slowly and prone to falls. I didn't get an award and appealed. My problem at the time was  all my life I tried to cover up any problems my condition caused. My husband came to appeal with me and I won the appeal Extremely grateful to get medium rate ( dla ) When the award ended,had another dwp doctor come out,for a start he had my condition down as chronic fatigue and even though a small thing he put I was a right handed woman,which I am not. Again had to appeal,funnily enough when I pointed out the errors,I. Was given award again . I am now 64, unfortunately I have more health conditions ,osteoporosis,sarcoidosis, asthma,classic migraines, hernias, and had scan and found to have twisted spine and dislocations.as the consultant said oh dear you got a lot going on. Have to be mindful as though diagnosis was made by geneticist as well as rheumatologist, medics don't like talking about ehler danlos syndrome,calling it rheumatics. It is not taken seriously,my GP refuses to acknowledge it,yet does with my other conditions.
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Lee · 1 years ago
      @Hypermobilecat Claim PIP again before you are 65. MAKE A CLAIM TODAY! You get nowt after 65. I claimed PIP four times and was refused each time. I made a final PIP claim when I was 64 and after the MANDATORY appeal was awarded full PIP living and mobility.
      Lee
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    JMJ · 1 years ago
    Dyspraxia and other Neurodiversities.  I can't drive due to mine, yet without a MEDICAL driving assessment I can't get a bus pass, but how my Dyspraxia affects me does not limit the distance I can walk, nor does it make me afraid to leave my home.  So, I will never qualify for enhanced mobility. 
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Porridge · 1 years ago
      @JMJ You should consider paying for a full dyspraxia assessment by a private psychiatrist or clinical psychologist. It may cost you money to get this, but it will give you a good idea of the severity of your condition and also provide evidence for a PIP application, so worth it. My brother has severe dyspraxia, I feel so sorry for him, life is hard, it’s no joke and I know that it affects every aspect of your life every day. And if you are anything like my brother, then yes, it would be dangerous for you to drive a car.
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Ann · 1 years ago
    i first claimed DLA for my son when he was 11 years old with ADHD and scopic sensativity and autistic spectrum disorder severe learning difficulties.years later they said he didnt have a diagnosis but i know he did .but we got sent to another doctor who again diagnosed him i had a letter stating this ,but i didnt see a need to keep it. so i contacted my gp for a copy of the letter to be told they had no record of it. so i rang the centre where we saw the doctor who diagnosed my son to be told he was no longer employed by them and they didnt have his records. after this we had to go to appeals and tribunals to win his case..i am now 70 in ill health i am so worried about my son and what will happen to him if i die

  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Arthur · 1 years ago
    The system is so deliberately unfair no condition guarantees a successful claim.
    Please remember it is how a condition affects your daily function not what condition you suffer from.
    To be assessed as unable to carry out a function and successfully claim is based on wether you cannot do an activity over 50% of the time,repeatedly,to a acceptable standard,safely and in a timely manner (timely means no more than twice the time a person without a disability. Over that you should be assessed as unable to carry out the task).

    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Claire · 1 years ago
      @Arthur Yes but some days and nights are worse than other days  .some days I can get in Bath myself. With my aids some days I can't lift hairbrush ..this is the problem..you cant explain how each day is going to be 
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Cc · 1 years ago
    I myself have 13 different proven/diagnosed physical/medical problems(15 if you count my skin condition and lactose intolerance as well) but yet they still had me on only standard daily living and mobility.It beggars belief how 'ill' they think you need to be to be recognised, doesnt it?!  Its ridiculous how the disabled have to 'prove' how bad we are in order to get what should be a legal right really.
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Lucy · 1 years ago
    ME - invisible, variable & no test. 
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Herbs · 1 years ago
      @Lucy Yes, agree with this and the condition doesn't easily fit their descriptors either. 
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Nina · 1 years ago
      @Lucy Yes - I haven't even tried to claim PIP because just getting ESA is so difficult with ME. I don't score many points on the WCA and have to appeal each time I'm assessed to make them apply the rule about risk of harm if found capable of work.
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Kerry C · 1 years ago
    Amongst other conditions I have Addisons disease and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Both of these conditions are classed as rare diseases. My assessor had little knowledge of either condition nor took the time to educate themselves about them. Information can be easily found online. My award ended up being reduced from enhanced care to standard despite me logging 5 more conditions and 50 pages of evidence. I lodged a mandatory reconsideration and had my enhanced care reinstated. The process was very traumatic. 
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    Cc · 1 years ago
    In answer to the aspergers question to porridge- i only know that son who has aspergers as well got nothing allowed on this, neither does my adult daughter who applied for PIP about 5yrs ago and has kept trying since, to no avail.
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    Sarah · 1 years ago
    I'd say that M E is one of the hardest to claim for. How do you explain brainfog to someone whose brain still works perfectly? If you can reply at all to their questions, they assume you're ok. Try telling them that you struggle to remember familiar names --- there are moments when I can only remember my name and that of of my partner. The other evening I didn't recognise a person I'd sat opposite just  five  minutes ago in a meeting. 
    I find Zoom meetings easier, because my computer will keep reminding me who's who! 
    Lack of energy is the other issue. We have to keep reminding the DWP that just because we could walk a certain number of yards a few minutes ago, we can't do that right now and we won't be able to do it again till we've rested. 
    I'll stop now, because I need a lie-down! I'm sure other M E folk can add to this list. 


    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Herbs · 1 years ago
      @Sarah definitely. I got told brain fog didn't count by an assessor because i'm not learning disabled yet its completely disabling. Also they really don't get energy issues and how long it can take to recover from something and how disabled you are while you're recovering. I basically got told I was lying about my ability levels after activity when I'm affected by PEM.
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    Charlie · 1 years ago
    This is VERY interesting, reading the document. One thing that stunned me was the fact that 83.6% of people claiming for "old age" are awarded PIP - I would LOVE more context on that, if possible. Like, is 'old age' listed when people have generalised degenerative symptoms common with ageing but no specific diagnosis?
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Porridge · 1 years ago
      @Charlie I think it is actually a genuine medical term which means someone who is elderly who have multiple chronic conditions or diseases. I am unsure what the age is though, maybe 80.
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    CP · 1 years ago
    It's generally accepted by parents of children with Type 1 diabetes that, whilst their children will be entitled to DLA at at least middle rate, the chances of them getting PIP when due to transfer is virtually zero.  Apparently, all the ways in which diabetes affects their lives magically disappear in their 16th birthday!  It would be interesting to see what percentage of T1 diabetics do qualify.
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Cc · 1 years ago
    Have 2 disabled sons- both have same basic condition-cerebral palsy. one has OCD with it- gets higher daily living &standard mobility at moment  but one has  3 other medical problems with it- yet he gets only basic daily living, no mobility, yet hes more 'ill' in general than his brother- i dare'nt mention that to DWP though in case they lower first sons award instead! And dare'nt ask them to review other son early in case they take off him What little he has.! Myself and older son both been waithing nearly 18 months (each) for them deciding our 'usual' review which was sent in, in oct 2021.
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Mr spriggs · 1 years ago
    Hi I have M.E,also ptsd,amongst other health problems, I recently went to tribunal,(what a joke),totally with dwp,most days in a week I can barely move or get out of bed but according to dwp,upheld by tribunal I can make a meal with help so have low points,so only get half what I should.The whole pip process is a bad joke that should be looked at.
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Lily · 1 years ago
    Lyme disease. Not treated by the NHS and told it's ME or similar so then hard to get the support for this totally life-changing and debilitating illness. Shocking! 
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Kaz · 1 years ago
    Hi, I was diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour in 2018. During radiotherapy I was assessed by a ''nurse''. Whom I thought I could trust. Instead, the report she wrote state I was not losing my sight. I have a brain tumour that sits on the optical nerve and main artery, without radiotherapy to shrink the tumour, I would lose my sight in both eyes and face death! The assessor even used the fact that my daughter turned up to sit with me during the assessment by stating. I was ok and recognised her arriving. This undermined my Oncologist, GP and Eye Consultants findings. I was scored just enough point to get basic PIP. 2023 I am facing a Tribunal as they still fail to accept the tumour, I also suffer from PTSD, Osteoarthritis and Fibromyalgia. My depression and anxiety has been off the scale as I wait for the Tribunal, now 6 months from my appeal notice. 
    It appears Brain tumours, Fibromyalgia a severely painful, tiring disorder, along with . PTSD and severe anxiety and depression are not on PIP assessors radar as serious enough to accept.
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Porridge · 1 years ago
      @Kaz In my experience, tribunals usually can see past what a nurse thinks to the truth. It’s sad but true that a lot of the time PIP and ESA claimants do have to apply for a tribunal in order to receive the award that they should have been granted in the fist place.
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Jackie · 1 years ago
      @Kaz Beware of the nice assessors in my experience they are normally the worse for rejecting your claim I have had some nice ones when I claimed esa as well but they have always given me 0 points so I have had to go to tribunal every time for esa and pip and I am always awarded it then ! 
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    Porridge · 1 years ago
    I have been receiving PIP for more than one (lifelong) physical disability but I have now been diagnosed as autistic and (very far along that spectrum too). I find it hard to cope with life because I am autistic and I have been protected and sheltered to some extent within the welfare benefits system because since I have been given enough to buy food and shelter Ihave avoided being forced to try and get and keep a paid job (I do volunteering) because of my physical problems. I am far too scared to reveal this new diagnosis to the DWP in case it triggers a “review” of my PIP award. The autism curtails my ability to go out, plan, understand when I should eat and many other basic things. I would like to know how people with high functioning autism (sometimes call Asperger Syndrome) fare at PIP assessments? I would particularly like to know if they are still forced to attend face to face assessments. I would like to volunteer for B&W if you need help with processing this data in order to drill down further (I am good at that type of thing), please get in touch if you require further assistance with that.
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Sally · 1 years ago
      @Porridge Hello porridge. Aspergers is scored zero. I was given nothing for anxiety/carpal tunnel syndrome/arthritis in both arms and hands. Scored zero for all. In fact old dla rate reduced and told 'my conditions had improved'(all are degenerative: arthritis/copd/carpal tunnel) and that I have 'adequate upper body dexterity' despite arthritis in hands as well as carpal tunnel and arthritic arms too. Scored nothing on asd/anxiety disorder/severe depression.
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Porridge · 1 years ago
      @Fionn Thank you so much for sharing your experience of a PIP assessment, it is very interesting and I am so sorry to hear that you even had to go through that. I had to have a face to face last time, which was absolutely terrifying. I have always stated in all my PIP, DLA and ESA applications that I have severe and refractory anxiety, which cannot be treated with CBT or any other kind of medication (apart from medical prescribed cannabis, which has bad unhelpful side effects), and also being extremely “clumsy”: problems with physical coordination. I therefore will not be suddenly revealing a whole new range of disabilities that were not there all along. I even been given a Blue Badge by the council even though I was assessed by the DWP as being not entitled to any mobility component.

      I realise you must be very anxious about your upcoming review. It might be worth you paying for a psychiatrist or a clinical psychologist to have an assessment and say that you need to gather evidence about the problems and difficulties you typically face day to day and that this is perfectly normal for someone with Asperger Syndrome to have those problems and that it is not appropriate for you to be exposed to a face to face assessment with the DWP, then at least you will have some fresh evidence to lay before them, and if they do not take that seriously it is hard evidence if you have to appeal. However, the fact that the DWP is aware that autism is a lifelong condition that does not change or “get better”, and you have already been granted PIP on the basis of that condition, then I should imagine that a review would amount to little more than an administrative matter for the DWP. Best wishes to you.
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Fionn · 1 years ago
      @Porridge I think a lot will depend on the assessor. I've only been assessed once for PIP, and it was hard going – partly because I was in a bit of a bad way and had major brain fog as well as the usual processing challenges. But the assessor was lovely and very patient. It took an hour and a half to go through my form, and although I was a shaking wreck by the end of it, I was fairly sure it had gone okay. I've also heard from people whose assessors were much less easy to deal with, though, so it's the luck of the draw. Under the guidelines in force at the time, autistic claimants were entitled to a home assessment, and that did help. I'm due for review soon, and I'll try for a paper-based assessment ... no idea how that will go!

      You maybe should tell them about your diagnosis if you can, as it says at the bottom of every letter that we're obliged to report any change in our circumstances. However, if you described some of these challenges in your original claim (albeit without saying they were due to autism), I guess you might arguably say that getting a formal diagnosis hasn't changed your circumstances? Good luck, whatever you decide to do.
  • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
    MrFibro · 1 years ago
    Just downloaded and read the full 500 listed conditions. Very interesting.
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      nika1000 · 1 years ago
      @MrFibro Sorry, found it
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      nika1000 · 1 years ago
      @MrFibro Hi! How did you download the whole list please? The link in the article leads to a general Stat-xplo page.
    • Thank you for your comment. Comments are moderated before being published.
      Lola68 · 1 years ago
      @MrFibro i know i was amazed and i know of people who've been flatly refused PIP for some of the higher %percentage conditions listed !

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